Sunday, August 9, 2015

Grace In All Things

I've owned Adam Miller's book Speculative Grace for some time now.[1] I've been meaning to read it, along with the hundreds of other books on my never-ending, ever-growing to-read list. Yet, Adam's approach to Mormonism inspires me. It takes Mormonism's materialist metaphysics seriously. This affinity for the sacred in the mundane stands out in his other works, both published and forthcoming.[2] His book made its way closer to the top of my to-read list thanks to a recent review in BYU Studies Quarterly. The following stood out to me:

...[T]he materialistic universe envisioned by Latour and subtly proposed by Miller is in harmony with the restored gospel's ability to encompass "small-scale, localized" objects (3) that are both spiritual and material (D&C 131:7-8). For Latter-day Saints, spiritual and temporal things maintain a close interplay (Mosiah 2:41; D&C 29:32)...Miller presents an object-oriented force of grace that permeates all these equal things. This flat structure of the universe is the context in which Miller consistently animates the principle of grace. Miller's grace is pluralistic, immanent, dynamic, and even ordinary, thereby transforming its meaning to enliven it with heightened relevance. 

...Miller's grace could function in LDS and certain other theologies in the sense that an anthropomorphic God is able to have relationships, grant blessings, and make covenants with his children. As Miller explains, "God is an object among a multitude of objects" (47), or, to use a saying commonly attributed to Lorenzo Snow, "As man now is, God once was; as God is now man may be."[3]

This view of grace can and should shape our outlook of everyday tasks (including work). Not only does it infuse the ordinary with the divine, but it also may play a role in bridging classical and materialist metaphysics.



NOTES

1. Adam S. Miller, Speculative Grace: Bruno Latour and Object-Oriented Theology (New York: Fordham University Press, 2013).

2. See his Letters to a Young Mormon (Provo: BYU, Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship, 2014); Rube Goldberg Machines: Essays in Mormon Theology (Salt Lake City: Greg Kofford Books, 2012); and his forthcoming The Gospel According to David Foster Wallace: Boredom and Addiction in an Age of Distraction (New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016).

3. Brent J. Schmidt, "Review of Adam S. Miller, Speculative Grace: Bruno Latour and Object-Oriented Theology," BYU Studies Quarterly 54:2 (2015): 203.

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