Tuesday, April 21, 2015

2015 Mormon Scholars in the Humanities Conference



I recently had a paper presented at the 2015 Mormon Scholars in the Humanities Conference at the LDS Institute of Religion and Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, CA. Unfortunately, I was unable to personally attend, but my friend Adam Miller was kind enough to read the paper on my behalf. The title is "'At This Time, A Friend Shall Lose His Friend's Hammer': An Eschatological View of Work." This paper has a lot in common with the one I presented at the Faith & Knowledge Conference in February and the Mormon Transhumanist Association Conference last year. However, there is a new emphasis on eschatology:


Abstract: Despite the Platonic ideal, people do not spend the majority of their time in the act of deep contemplation. Instead, they are performing the seemingly menial tasks of daily life. This largely consists of one’s form of employment. Similarly, implicit within the dramatics of apocalyptic prophecies and eschatological visions is the continuity of the mundane. In building the Kingdom of God, Church leaders from Brigham Young to John Widtsoe continued along the path set by Joseph Smith whose theology collapsed the traditional distance between the sacred and the secular. Furthermore, they argued that continual progression gave meaning to the eternity. Finding meaning in the lone and dreary world of day-to-day work has been a point of increasing interest among management experts and organizational theorists. Their findings yield fruitful insights into human well-being and consequently Mormonism’s doctrine of eternal progression. This paper discusses how the positive psychology underlying concepts of flow, mastery, engagement, and progress provides a powerful lens through which to realistically view human progression towards Zion, life in the age to come, and eventual divinization.

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